UNDP Disability-inclusive development

UNDP Disability-inclusive development

Disability-inclusive development

More than 15 percent of the global population — over 1 billion people — are estimated to have a disability, 80 percent of whom live in developing countries. Many of them are consistently left out of development gains. In post-conflict situations, during crisis or natural disasters, People with Disabilities (PWDs) are disproportionately affected. In addition, discriminatory attitudes limit their full participation in society, and contribute to a rise in inequality.

Over the last decade, UNDP has played a positive role at both global and national levels in helping over 70 Member States to implement the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) – both through targeted efforts and through mainstreaming support to PWDs. The 2030 Agenda’s pledge to leave no-one behind offers a new opportunity to help strengthen the rights of PWDs.

UNDP undertakes disability inclusive development by supporting countries to develop and strengthen disability law and policy frameworks, improve accessibility of services, social protection, livelihood opportunities, and promote the participation of PWDs in political and public life.

UNDP hosts the secretariat of the United Nations Partnership on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNPRPD), bringing together UN entities, governments, and organizations that advance the rights of persons with disabilities.

WHO work related to persons with disabilities

WHO work related to persons with disabilities

WHO work related to persons with disabilities

Disabilities is an umbrella term, covering impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. An impairment is a problem in body function or structure; an activity limitation is a difficulty encountered by an individual in executing a task or action; while a participation restriction is a problem experienced by an individual in involvement in life situations.

Disability is thus not just a health problem. It is a complex phenomenon, reflecting the interaction between features of a person’s body and features of the society in which he or she lives. Overcoming the difficulties faced by people with disabilities requires interventions to remove environmental and social barriers.

People with disabilities have the same health needs as non-disabled people – for immunization, cancer screening etc. They also may experience a narrower margin of health, both because of poverty and social exclusion, and also because they may be vulnerable to secondary conditions, such as pressure sores or urinary tract infections. Evidence suggests that people with disabilities face barriers in accessing the health and rehabilitation services they need in many settings.

UNICEF work related to persons with disabilities

UNICEF work related to persons with disabilities

UNICEF work related to persons with disabilities

Children with disabilities are one of the most marginalized and excluded groups in society. Facing daily discrimination in the form of negative attitudes, lack of adequate policies and legislation, they are effectively barred from realizing their rights to healthcare, education, and even survival.

Estimates suggest that there are at least 93 million children with disabilities in the world, but numbers could be much higher. They are often likely to be among the poorest members of the population. They are less likely to attend school, access medical services, or have their voices heard in society. Their disabilities also place them at a higher risk of physical abuse, and often exclude them from receiving proper nutrition or humanitarian assistance in emergencies.

UNICEF vision is to build a world where every child can grow up healthy, protected from harm and educated, so they can reach their full potential. Every day we’re working to make this vision a reality. No matter who they are or where they are born, we reach out to the most vulnerable children wherever and whenever they need us”.


Watch video about Eaz, 18 years old, Syrian refugee with disability



Watch video about Amir, 16 years old, talented boy from Nepal

Protecting the rights of children with disabilities is not a new theme for UNICEF. It has been an integral part of our programming since the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) – the first international treaty to explicitly recognize the rights of children with disabilities. With the passing of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), our disability work has gained momentum.

UNICEF work has a renewed and intensified focus on equity, which seeks to identify and address the root causes of inequality so that all children – particularly those who face the worst deprivations in society – can realize their rights.

The equity-based approach is one of the foundations of our disability agenda, the main goals of which are to mainstream disability across all of our policies and programmes – both in development and humanitarian action – and to develop leadership on the rights of children with disabilities, building capacity among staff and partners.

UN Division for Social Policy and Development Disability

UN Division for Social Policy and Development Disability

The UN Programme on Disability/Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (SCRPD) falls within the Division for Social Inlusive Social Development (DISD) of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA).

Mission Statement

Our global mission is to promote the rights and advancement of persons with disabilities within a broad mandate provided by the World Programme of Action (1982), Standard Rules (1994) and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006), as well as other relevant human rights and development instruments.

Within the United Nations system, the Focal Point on Disability work to:

  • Support inter-governmental bodies such as the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC);
  • Service the Conference of State Parties to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities;
  • Promote the international normative framework on disability;
  • Implement international norms and standards relating to disability at national, regional and international levels; technical cooperation;
  • Mainstream disability in the development agenda, including the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and other internationally agreed development goals;
  • Co-chair the United Nations Inter-agency Support Group on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (IASG).

 

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